California Department of Transportation
 

California Department of Transportation

Today's Date: Oct.23, 2015
District: 2
Contact: Denise Yergenson
Phone: (530) 209-4419

CALIFORNIA TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ADOPTS 114 BIKING AND
WALKING PROJECTS FOR 2015 ACTIVE TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM

Commission also allocates more than $165 million to repair highways and bridges, improve road
safety and reduce congestion

Redding  – The California Transportation Commission (CTC) has adopted 114 biking and walking projects, valued at more than $262 million, in the state’s 2015 Active Transportation Program.

“Caltrans has a strategic goal to triple cycling and double walking and transit trips statewide by 2020,” said Caltrans Director Malcolm Dougherty. “We are committed to investing in projects that expand the availability of bike and pedestrian access throughout the state.”

California’s Active Transportation Program (ATP) is the largest of its type in the nation and funds most of the state’s walking and bicycle projects. The bicycle and pedestrian projects funded by the ATP not only encourage increased use of active modes of transportation, but they support sustainable communities and healthier, low-carbon travel choices.

Examples of ATP projects adopted today include:

Shasta Regional Transportation Agency was allocated $500,000 for a non-infrastructure Safe Route to School project from the Cycle 1 of the Active Transportation Program.  This project included work within the school districts of Cascade Union, Redding School District and Shasta Union High School District.  The goal of this project will be to increase the number of children walking and biking to schools.

There are six Cycle 2 Active Transportation Projects (ATP) that were adopted at the October CTC meeting.

The City of Redding had two successful project:

  • The Diestelhorst to Downtown Non-Motorized Improvement Project received will span a corridor from the Sacramento River Trailhead to Diestelhorst Bridge and into downtown neighborhoods under and via Benton and Riverside Drives, Center and Division Streets. This project received $2,137,942 in ATP funds with a total project cost of $2,637,942 and is programmed for construction in 2017/2018.
  • The Quartz Hill Road Active Transportation Project will widen the uphill road grade along Quartz Hill for Class II bike lanes and add sidewalks as well as offer a road diet to add bike lanes and enhance pedestrian crossings distance to/from neighborhood to the park and connect to trails and school better.  This project received $3,177,000 in ATP funds with a total project cost of $3,528,000 and is programmed for construction in 2016/2017.

The County of Shasta had two to successful projects:

  • The Old Oregon Trail Shasta College Active Transportation Project will install bike lanes, pavement markings and a flashing beacon on Shasta College campus as well as add bike lanes and improve intersections for non-motorized users on Old Oregon Trail.  This project closes gaps in bicycle facilities along Old Oregon trail and the College. This project received $572,000 in ATP funds with a total project cost of $716,000 and is programmed for construction in 2018.
  • The Junction School Safe Routes to School project will implement a Road Diet, which reduces the section of Deschutes Road adjacent to Junction School from five to three lanes.  This project also will provide a raised median crosswalk refuge island to enhance crossing safety.  This project received $377,000 in ATP funds with a total project cost of $578,000 and is programmed for construction in 2018.

The Shasta Regional Transportation Agency had one successful project:

  • The GoShasta Active Transportation Plan is a Plan level non-infrastructure project that will coordinate planning efforts by integrating local projects and policies into a regional plan, organizing data for smaller cities and Shasta County to prepare applications for future funding.  This project received $250,000 in ATP funds with a total project cost of $313,000.  Work will start on this project summer 2016.

Trinity County had one successful project:

  • Trinity County will use their ATP funds to develop an Active Transportation Plan that identifies active transportation infrastructure projects and encouragement / education programs that increase the use of active modes of transportation as well as improves safety.  This project received $110,244 in ATP funds with a total project cost of $112,494.  Work will begin on this project the fall of 2016.

Click here to view a list of all 114 adopted ATP projects and detailed information about the program can be found on Caltrans’ website. The adopted projects comprise two components: the Statewide Program ($179.9 million for 87 projects) and the Small Urban/Rural Program ($35.5 million for 27 projects). More than 85 percent of the funds ($184.5 million) for these components directly benefit disadvantaged communities.

Caltrans received 617 applications from cities and counties across California, totaling more than $1 billion in project requests. California’s nine largest Metropolitan Planning Organizations (Bay Area, Fresno, Sacramento, San Diego, Southern California, San Jose, Stanislaus, Tulare and Kern) are still eligible to recommend projects to the CTC on an additional $143.64 million in active transportation funds designated specifically to their regions based on population. The CTC will adopt projects submitted by MPOs in December.

Continuing the drive to rebuild California’s infrastructure, the Commission also allocated more than $165 million to 39 transportation projects that will improve and maintain the state’s transportation system. These allocations include $28.9 million for Transit and Intercity Rail Program projects and $3.2 million towards 13 ATP projects.

Among the projects that received funding allocations today were:

SISKIYOU COUNTY:

  • The City of Dorris was allocated $225,000 in Construction funds for a rehabilitation project on North Oregon Street from First Street to Sly Street.  Prior STIP allocation of $28,000 were used for Environmental and Design.
  • The City of Etna was allocation $339,000 in Construction funds for a rehabilitation on Scott Street from Collier Way to State Route 3.  Prior STIP allocations of $31,000 were used for Environmental and Design.
  • The City of Mt. Shasta was allocated $12,000 to start the Environmental phase of work to replace damaged guardrail and add new guardrail on North Mt. Shasta Boulevard between Ski Village Drive and Spring Hill Road.  This project is proposed to go to construction in 2016 and will cost $241,000.
  • The City of Yreka was allocated $3,000 to start the Environmental phase of work to rehabilitate existing pavement on North Oregon Street from Miner Street to the north end.  This project is proposed to go to construction in 2017 and will cost $647,000.
  • The City of Weed was allocated $65,000 to start the Environmental phase of work to rehabilitation Vista Drive from the beginning of Vista Drive on the west side of I-5, northeast approximately 2300 feet. This project is proposed to go to construction in 2018 and will cost $1,860,000.
  • The City of Mt. Shasta was allocated $6,000 to start the Environmental phase of work to rehabilitated Ream Avenue from Mt. Shasta Boulevard to the City limits.  Work will include adding curb, gutter and sidewalk to improve safety.  This project is proposed to go to construction in 2017 and will cost $272,000.

The CTC approved the 2015 Interregional Transportation Strategic Plan (ITSP), which will be a guiding document for all investment in the interregional transportation system. The policies in the 2015 ITSP focus on improving the interregional movement of people and freight in a safe and sustainable manner that supports the economy. Caltrans will now proceed to incorporate the updates identified by the CTC at the meeting and make any remaining non-substantive changes to the document before it is finalized.

Please see the attached file for more information about all projects that received allocations.

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